Down The TBR Hole #2: Cassie Edition

ALL SYNOPSIS TAKEN FROM GOODREADS!


I found out about this meme because Kris Marie from Boston Book Reader does it regularly on her blog! It, however, originated with Lost in a Story that deserves all the recognition for starting this great meme for the book blogging community!

The purpose of this meme is to go through your TBR (I am using GoodReads at first and then plan on going through my home books after!) and decide if you are going to keep the book or if you are getting rid of it on your TBR!  For a more formal understanding here is the original wording from the first “Down the TBR Hole” by Lost in a Story:

Anyway, it works like this:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10 if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?

Currently, I have 313 books on my GR TBR, so I have decided to go through five of the books on the list at a time. I am hoping to get it lowered to at least only 200 by the time this is over. Wish me luck, I am going to need it! I will also be keeping track of the number of books that I remove from my GR TBR during this process, so that a final statistical number of removed titles is available because well I can and I want to see how many I removed after all is said and done. 🙂


THE BOOKS: 

SYNOPSIS: Elsa is seven years old and different. Her grandmother is seventy-seven years old and crazy, standing-on-the-balcony-firing-paintball-guns-at-men-who-want-to-talk-about-Jesus-crazy. She is also Elsa’s best, and only, friend. At night Elsa takes refuge in her grandmother’s stories, in the Land of Almost-Awake and the Kingdom of Miamas where everybody is different and nobody needs to be normal.

When Elsa’s grandmother dies and leaves behind a series of letters apologizing to people she has wronged, Elsa’s greatest adventure begins. Her grandmother’s letters lead her to an apartment building full of drunks, monsters, attack dogs, and totally ordinary old crones, but also to the truth about fairytales and kingdoms and a grandmother like no other.

DECISION: STAYING!!!
REASON: I was recently going through a book buying binge and I purchased this book. I have been wanting to read it for awhile. It feels almost personal that I have to read this book, so it can’t be removed. This book will be read EVENTUALLY.


SYNOPSIS: A grumpy yet loveable man finds his solitary world turned on its head when a boisterous young family moves in next door.

Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon, the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him the bitter neighbor from hell, but must Ove be bitter just because he doesn’t walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time?

Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents’ association to their very foundations.

DECISION: Sorry, it stays as well. (Noticing a pattern already lol)
REASON: When I was purchasing books, I also purchased this one to read. It sounded like something I would enjoy reading. It doesn’t feel as personal, for some reason, as having to read the other book by him, but I still want to read this one. I can’t remove it in good conscious at this time.


SYNOPSIS: Britt-Marie can’t stand mess. A disorganized cutlery drawer ranks high on her list of unforgivable sins. She is not one to judge others—no matter how ill-mannered, unkempt, or morally suspect they might be. It’s just that sometimes people interpret her helpful suggestions as criticisms, which is certainly not her intention. But hidden inside the socially awkward, fussy busybody is a woman who has more imagination, bigger dreams, and a warmer heart that anyone around her realizes.

When Britt-Marie walks out on her cheating husband and has to fend for herself in the miserable backwater town of Borg—of which the kindest thing one can say is that it has a road going through it—she finds work as the caretaker of a soon-to-be demolished recreation center. The fastidious Britt-Marie soon finds herself being drawn into the daily doings of her fellow citizens, an odd assortment of miscreants, drunkards, layabouts. Most alarming of all, she’s given the impossible task of leading the supremely untalented children’s soccer team to victory. In this small town of misfits, can Britt-Marie find a place where she truly belongs?

DECISION: UGH, PATTERN! Keeping!
REASON:  While, I did not purchase this one during the binge I want to read it after I finish the other two, so I can’t just remove it. It just sounds exactly like the kind of book that I would devour, if I just got to reading it.


 

SYNOPSIS: Some books improve with age–the age of the reader, that is. Such is certainly the case with Philip Pullman’s heroic, at times heart-wrenching novel, The Golden Compass, a story ostensibly for children but one perhaps even better appreciated by adults. The protagonist of this complex fantasy is young Lyra Belacqua, a precocious orphan growing up within the precincts of Oxford University. But it quickly becomes clear that Lyra’s Oxford is not precisely like our own–nor is her world. For one thing, people there each have a personal dæmon, the manifestation of their soul in animal form. For another, hers is a universe in which science, theology, and magic are closely allied:

As for what experimental theology was, Lyra had no more idea than the urchins. She had formed the notion that it was concerned with magic, with the movements of the stars and planets, with tiny particles of matter, but that was guesswork, really. Probably the stars had dæmons just as humans did, and experimental theology involved talking to them.

Not that Lyra spends much time worrying about it; what she likes best is “clambering over the College roofs with Roger the kitchen boy who was her particular friend, to spit plum stones on the heads of passing Scholars or to hoot like owls outside a window where a tutorial was going on, or racing through the narrow streets, or stealing apples from the market, or waging war.” But Lyra’s carefree existence changes forever when she and her dæmon, Pantalaimon, first prevent an assassination attempt against her uncle, the powerful Lord Asriel, and then overhear a secret discussion about a mysterious entity known as Dust. Soon she and Pan are swept up in a dangerous game involving disappearing children, a beautiful woman with a golden monkey dæmon, a trip to the far north, and a set of allies ranging from “gyptians” to witches to an armor-clad polar bear.

In The Golden Compass, Philip Pullman has written a masterpiece that transcends genre. It is a children’s book that will appeal to adults, a fantasy novel that will charm even the most hardened realist. Best of all, the author doesn’t speak down to his audience, nor does he pull his punches; there is genuine terror in this book, and heartbreak, betrayal, and loss. There is also love, loyalty, and an abiding morality that infuses the story but never overwhelms it. This is one of those rare novels that one wishes would never end. Fortunately, its sequel, The Subtle Knife, will help put off that inevitability for a while longer. –Alix Wilber

DECISION: UGH STAYING AS WELL!
REASON: I feel that a hit would be placed on my life if I removed this book from my TBR by multiple people. Yes, there are a few people that even comment here that I fear would end me 😉 I also live with one of these people, so it is staying for now. Am I going to get rid of any this week? Not shaping up to be a get rid of week here is it? lol


 

SYNOPSIS: From the author of the beloved New York Timesbestselling book Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? and the creator and star of The Mindy Projectcomes a collection of essays that are as hilarious and insightful as they are deeply personal. 

In Why Not Me?, Kaling shares her ongoing journey to find contentment and excitement in her adult life, whether it’s falling in love at work, seeking new friendships in lonely places, attempting to be the first person in history to lose weight without any behavior modification whatsoever, or most important, believing that you have a place in Hollywood when you’re constantly reminded that no one looks like you.
In “How to Look Spectacular: A Starlet’s Confessions”, Kaling gives her tongue-in-cheek secrets for surefire on-camera beauty, (“Your natural hair color may be appropriate for your skin tone, but this isn’t the land of appropriate-this is Hollywood, baby. Out here, a dark-skinned woman s traditional hair color is honey blonde.”) “Player” tells the story of Kaling being seduced and dumped by a female friend in L.A. (“I had been replaced by a younger model. And now they had matching bangs.”) In “Unlikely Leading Lady”, she muses on America’s fixation with the weight of actresses, (“Most women we see onscreen are either so thin that they’re walking clavicles or so huge that their only scenes involve them breaking furniture.”) And in “Soup Snakes”, Kaling spills some secrets on her relationship with her ex-boyfriend and close friend, B.J. Novak (“I will freely admit: my relationship with B.J. Novak is weird as hell.”)
Mindy turns the anxieties, the glamour, and the celebrations of her second coming-of-age into a laugh-out-loud funny collection of essays that anyone who’s ever been at a turning point in their life or career can relate to. And those who’ve never been at a turning point can skip to the parts where she talks about meeting Bradley Cooper.

DECISION: Bye Mindy sorry, I still love you…
REASON:This was hard, but the reality is that I haven’t read the first book she wrote. I feel that I have to start there. I am not sure I would even get around to that. I think I support her more in her acting career than I do in her writing career. That isn’t a bad thing either. We all have preferences for people and that is where I enjoy my Mindy!


REMOVAL: 1 out of 5
KEPT: 4 out of 5

TOTAL REMOVED TO DATE: 4 (UGH, this week was hard!)
MY GOODREADS TBR TAB: 309/313


9 Replies to “Down The TBR Hole #2: Cassie Edition”

  1. KRIS

    Don’t get too frustrated by keeping so many at the beginning 😂 it’s hard to say bye to so many books you’ve had on your the for so long! I love that you are adding your tally at the bottom!

    Reply
    • cgwinters1981 Post author

      Thanks, I am trying not to get too frustrated, but darn isn’t this about getting rid of books? hehe I thought the tally would keep me more honest and accountable to the process, so thanks!

      Reply
  2. Lucy-May

    I’ve been so bad at removing books so far as well so you’re not alone 😂 my Grandmother Told Me To Tell You She’s Sorry sounds so cute though so I’ve added it to my to-buy list ahaha – thanks!!!

    Reply
    • cgwinters1981 Post author

      I looked at your last one and laughed because you are definitely right, you are having just as hard a time removing stuff. Made me feel better 😉 It does sound cute, which is why I have wanted to read it so badly. Ugh, now I am wanting to read it more and more! Thanks for stopping by!

      Reply
  3. Danielle

    I am so glad you didn’t get rid of The Golden Compass! It was my favorite book for years upon years! It’s definitely worth reading! I also have heard amazing things about Fredrik Backman so I’m glad you chose to keep those books as well.

    Reply

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